Code simplicity

 

I’ve just finished the book Code Simplicity. It presents a framework for thinking about software development in the form of laws and rules. It’s short but comprehensive. From my experience, the laws and rules hold true. I think the book has value as an overall perspective of what’s important in software development, and there are some chapters that are really spot on: for example, the equation of software design – something that I’ve already included in my glossary and plan to expand.

Code Simplicity doesn’t intend to land the laws and rules to something actionable, though. I’m at a point in my career where I’m focused on consolidating and reflecting upon how to achieve simplicity in software design – that means that I crave for specifics so I can compare them with mine.

As a cross-recommendation, if you are interested in learning about the laws of software development in a manner that is actionable, I’d suggest reading the Beck’s trilogy: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change, Test Driven Development: by example, and Implementation Patterns. Those three books make a great combination of macro-forces (at a project level) and micro-forces (at a coding level) in software design. They were fundamental in consolidating my experiences as a programmer, so I’m highly biased towards them.

Hat tip for the Code Simplicity recommendation: Nikolay.

Turns out algorithms are racists

«Technology is neither good nor bad; nor is it neutral.»

Melvin Kranzberg’s six laws of technology

One of the things I was very into a decade ago was studying the intertwine between technology, culture, and society. From those years, I developed a sensitivity about my role as an engineer, or as an enabler of possible worlds.

This is one of the things I wanted to avoid:

A person isn’t able to clean his hands because the machine sensors are only prepared to detect white hands! That’s a horror story that could make a BlackMirror episode.

This made me think about the mainstream perception of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence technology. Lately, some friends of mine are sharing with me clickbait news like Facebook shuts down robots after they invent their own language. They ask me if robots could take over, soon. Well, I can tell you something: at this stage of technology, I am not worried about robots taking over. What I do worry about is how our inability to understand technology creates racists algorithms that reinforce our biases.