My first plant

My parents in law got me an evergreen bonsai for Christmas, a Ficus Retusa.

It's not until recently that I've got interested in the idea of growing a plant. I find fascinating that you can mold a living being to your liking, within certain constraints. Every branch contains a possibility, and you've got to decide which ones to develop. The fact that it's a slow process that takes years to fully see the results speaks of the patience and constant caring you need to put into it. I don't want to think too much about that because the thought of committing myself to something for so long is scary! At the same time, I've found a sense of calm and bonding in things like cleaning every individual leaf of the tree once a month – I can understand much better now to Paul Richardson, the exo-botanist of Mars.

Being the first plant I own, I'm still learning a lot about everything: its watering needs, what's a good pruning balance, how to identify and treat pests and diseases, etc. So far, it's been enjoyable.

UKL passed away

I’ve just learned that Ursula K. Le Guin is no longer with us. She left multiple worlds for us to play with and learn from. Two of them –The Left Hand of Darkness, and The Dispossessed– are my goto guides when it comes to imagining societies that take into account the role of self-management, genre, language, and free commerce. We cannot bring her back, but we still have her words to read all that she wanted to tell us.

Shelter from the Storm

Mars soundtrack (the National Geographic tv-show) is fantastic. Nick Cave is just the perfect voice to convey that feeling of exploration and fear. Moon, Interstellar, The Martian, etc; it seems sci-fi movies got an appreciation for soundtracks that have a major role in the film – and I enjoy that.

As much as I like Cave’s main theme for Mars, after a few episodes, I was in the need of something like Dylan’s Shelter from the Storm. Exploration needs joy and celebration.

Agile according to Basecamp

Running in Circles is Basecamp’s view of agile product management. They acknowledge the value of working in cycles, but add three pieces: having the time to focus, being able to modify the original plan, and tackle the core unknowns of the feature first.

The first two are enablers that are provided to the makers by management. The last part is how the maker make the most of those powers. Together, they form a process that is nicely captured with the uphill / downhill metaphor. Uphill you are discovering the unknowns and making decisions about what goes in, downhill everything is clear and you are implementing it at warp factor 10: