Tempestades de sal, Sés

Sés is a Galician singersongwriter. Her stage presence and lyrics reminds me of what it means to grow in small villages by the periphery. I feel connected to that dignity and survival skills, because it embodies the attitude of the women I grew around. The Galician matriachy.

UKL passed away

I’ve just learned that Ursula K. Le Guin is no longer with us. She left multiple worlds for us to play with and learn from. Two of them –The Left Hand of Darkness, and The Dispossessed– are my goto guides when it comes to imagining societies that take into account the role of self-management, genre, language, and free commerce. We cannot bring her back, but we still have her words to read all that she wanted to tell us.

Shelter from the Storm

Mars soundtrack (the National Geographic tv-show) is fantastic. Nick Cave is just the perfect voice to convey that feeling of exploration and fear. Moon, Interstellar, The Martian, etc; it seems sci-fi movies got an appreciation for soundtracks that have a major role in the film – and I enjoy that.

As much as I like Cave’s main theme for Mars, after a few episodes, I was in the need of something like Dylan’s Shelter from the Storm. Exploration needs joy and celebration.

The thing that get us to the thing

Past Saturday, AMC aired Halt and Catch Fire season finale. I saw this tv-show grow over 4 seasons and I’m sad it’s over.

HACF resonated with me because it was about the pleasure of making things work and the cost of pursuing your dreams. We need a whole lot more stories about the woes and joys of creation to learn how to navigate that world and to inspire us. We need more builders and dreamers capable of not burning themselves out.

Bonus points for using the evolution of computers as the McGuffin. But, as much as I liked the history of computers being the central plot of a well done period  drama, HACF wasn’t about computers. The computers aren’t the thing. They are the thing that get us to the thing.

The pleasure of finding things out

This was the first book listening experience that I’ve actually finished. Sean Runnette‘s voice was adequate for setting the tone and rhythm – actually, sometimes I felt I was listening to Feinmann himself!

Having read Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!What Do You Care What Other People Think? and some other papers/videos, most of the stories in the book I already knew, but it had some new material that made it interesting nonetheless. This is more mathematical/physical intense than the others, probably because it’s mostly focused on the scientific and less in the human Feynman – but also because many chapters are directly transcribed from conferences he gave. It’s also worth noting that, unlike the other two, this book was published without Feynmann intervention: it’s published 10 years after his death.

If I had to choose only a Feynman book I’d choose Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynmann! It’s better edited and has more variety. Then, if you are hungry for more, What do you care what other people think? contains new stories. I liked this one, but I doubt it’s a good introduction to Feynmann lifestyle, work, values, and character.

Code simplicity


I’ve just finished the book Code Simplicity. It presents a framework for thinking about software development in the form of laws and rules. It’s short but comprehensive. From my experience, the laws and rules hold true. I think the book has value as an overall perspective of what’s important in software development, and there are some chapters that are really spot on: for example, the equation of software design – something that I’ve already included in my glossary and plan to expand.

Code Simplicity doesn’t intend to land the laws and rules to something actionable, though. I’m at a point in my career where I’m focused on consolidating and reflecting upon how to achieve simplicity in software design – that means that I crave for specifics so I can compare them with mine.

As a cross-recommendation, if you are interested in learning about the laws of software development in a manner that is actionable, I’d suggest reading the Beck’s trilogy: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change, Test Driven Development: by example, and Implementation Patterns. Those three books make a great combination of macro-forces (at a project level) and micro-forces (at a coding level) in software design. They were fundamental in consolidating my experiences as a programmer, so I’m highly biased towards them.

Hat tip for the Code Simplicity recommendation: Nikolay.

Ryanair boarding songs

Some years ago, when boarding on Ryanair, the music played over the speakers was a classical and vibrant song – being Ryanair, likely a royalty-free one. Some declare it was Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 5:

Lately, they’ve changed to a more modern electronic style, at least as vibrant as before:

I like the new one much better. For a few seconds, I thought «they have probably hired someone with a better sense for music», but then I realized that it’s the same kind of song you hear on the teenager stores these days. And I know why they changed it: to keep you moving!

Faster, if possible.